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DDR5 memory coming, and it is sad long story
  • Rambus now has working prototypes of DDR5 , the next major interface for DRAM dual in-line memory modules (DIMMs). The register clock drivers and data buffers could help double the throughput of main memory in servers, probably starting in 2019 — and they are already sparking a debate about the future of computing.

    The Jedec standards group plans to release before June the DDR5 spec as the default memory interface for next-generation servers. However, some analysts note it comes at a time of emerging alternatives in persistent memories, new computer architectures and chip stacks.

    “To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to have functional DDR5 DIMM chip sets in the lab. We are expecting production in 2019, and we want to be first to market to help partners bring up the technology”

    DDR5 is expected to support data rates up to 6.4 Gbits/second delivering 51.2 GBytes/s max, up from 3.2 Gbits and 25.6 GBytes/s for today’s DDR4. The new version will push the 64-bit link down to 1.1V and burst lengths to 16 bits from 1.2V and 8 bits. In addition, DDR5 lets voltage regulators ride on the memory card rather than the motherboard.

    CPU vendors are expected to expand the number of DDR channels on their processors from 12 to 16. That could drive main memory sizes to 128 Gbytes from 64 GB today.

    The DDR5 standard will arrive about the same time Jedec releases its NVMDIMM-p interface for memory modules supporting a mix of DRAM and persistent memory. Intel said it will roll out server DIMMs next year using its 3D XPoint chips.

    A lot of people don’t think DDR5 will be the next-generation memory interface. Process technology shrinks for DRAMs are approaching the physical limits of its core capacitors, leading experts to project the end the memory designs in five to ten years. Higher error rates are already requiring correcting code circuitry on the chips.

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  • Hynix announced that it’s developed a 16GB DDR5 memory chip t- first to match the upcoming JEDEC standard for DDR5.

    It must be noted that DDR5 memory uses less power while offering faster speeds than today’s DDR4 memory. SK Hynix says mass production isn’t scheduled to begin until 2020.

    16GB SK Hynix memory solution supports data transfer speeds up to 5200 Mbps, which makes it about 60 percent faster than DDR4 memory, which supports speeds up to 3200 Mbps.

  • Micron Technology has begun sampling DDR5 Registered DIMMs (RDIMM) based on its 1znm process technology, according to the company.

    DDR5, the most technologically advanced DRAM to date, will enable the next generation of server workloads by delivering more than an 85% increase in memory performance, Micron noted. DDR5 doubles memory density while improving reliability at a time when data center system architects seek to supply rapidly growing processor core counts with increased memory bandwidth and capacity.

    DDR5 will deliver more than a 1.85 times increase in performance compared to DDR4. DDR5 also enables the increased reliability, availability and serviceability (RAS) that modern data centers require, Micron indicated.

    PR

    Micron Technology, Inc. (MU) today announced that it has begun sampling DDR5 Registered DIMMs (RDIMM), based on its industry-leading 1znm process technology. DDR5, the most technologically advanced DRAM to date, will enable the next generation of server workloads by delivering more than an 85% increase in memory performance. DDR5 doubles memory density while improving reliability at a time when data center system architects seek to supply rapidly growing processor core counts with increased memory bandwidth and capacity.

    “Data center workloads will be increasingly challenged to extract value from the accelerating growth of data across virtually all applications,” said Tom Eby, senior vice president and general manager of the Compute & Networking Business Unit at Micron. “The key to enabling these workloads is higher-performance, denser, higher-quality memory. Micron’s sampling of DDR5 RDIMMs represents a significant milestone, bringing the industry one step closer to unlocking the value in next-generation data-centric applications.”

    Advanced workloads resulting from rapidly expanding datasets and compute-intensive applications have fueled processor core count growth which will be bandwidth-starved by current DRAM technology. DDR5 will deliver more than a 1.85 times increase in performance compared to DDR4. DDR5 also enables the increased reliability, availability and serviceability (RAS) that modern data centers require.

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  • Differences

    VDD/VDDQ/VPP voltages are not default at 1.1v instead of 1.2v for DDR4. And they won't get lower, instead of all good modules they will be higher and on DDR4 levels. Ads it is physics that won't allow lower voltages.

    Stick density can increase from 16GB to 64GB, yet default will be still 16Gb per stick max.

    Prefetch length increased from 8n to 16n, is it'll be same initial delay as on DDR4, but idea to transfer more data at once, hence big cache on CPU will help.

  • SK Hynix DDR5 RDIMM

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  • LPDDR5 started shipping

    Micron offers 6, 8 and 12Gb chips packaging with speed being double of that of LPDDR4x.

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